Post Office A map of 1875 shows the location of the Post Office at that time, close to the wharf at the southern end of Mill Street. The current Post Office, bearing the date 1901 on its south face, was constructed in the Romanesque Revival style to the designs of the Chief Architect’s Branch of the Department of Public Works, directed from 1897-1914 by David Ewart (please see insert on this style and the Chief Architect’s Branch). At this time, post offices were important symbols of federal authority, often being some of the imposing and significant structures in a municipality small or large. The Deseronto Post Office also provided accommodation for the Customs Service, the Indian Agent, and living space in the third level for an employee or caretaker. Life in Deseronto, and in the third-level residential space, has been portrayed in Frances Itani’s novel Deafening (2003). To warrant such a commanding, multi-purpose structure attests to the economic importance of Deseronto and its busy harbour when the building was constructed. Clock faces on all sides of the upper level of the tower further distinguish the building, and provided an important public service in a period when reliable watches and clocks were not too common among factory labourers. The imposing nature of the building’s design is augmented by the use of local Quinte limestone and whiter Kingston limestone used for the finely tooled arches, corbels in the eaves, and random distribution throughout the Quinte limestone walls. This decorative use of two types of limestone can be seen in St. Mark’s Hall, completed 1888 [site 24]. Architectural details Square tower with adjoining tower-like bay Stone gables Wooden dormer windows Ashlar masonry surrounds of the heavy arched openings and clock faces Metal and slate roofs Variety of window shapes and sizes Stone corbels supporting the overhanging sloped roofs Rugged, heavy stonework

(Click on the image above for a closer look.)

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Post Office

A map of 1875 shows the location of the Post Office at that time, close to the wharf at the southern end of Mill Street.

The current Post Office, bearing the date 1901 on its south face, was constructed in the Romanesque Revival style to the designs of the Chief Architect’s Branch of the Department of Public Works, directed from 1897-1914 by David Ewart. At this time, post offices were important symbols of federal authority, often being some of the imposing and significant structures in a municipality small or large.

The Deseronto Post Office also provided accommodation for the Customs Service, the Indian Agent, and living space in the third level for an employee or caretaker. Life in Deseronto, and in the third-level residential space, has been portrayed in Frances Itani’s novel Deafening (2003) and its follow-up, Tell (2014).

To warrant such a commanding, multi-purpose structure attests to the economic importance of Deseronto and its busy harbour when the building was constructed. Clock faces on all sides of the upper level of the tower further distinguish the building, and provided an important public service in a period when reliable watches and clocks were not too common among factory labourers.

The imposing nature of the building’s design is augmented by the use of local Quinte limestone and whiter Kingston limestone used for the finely tooled arches, corbels in the eaves, and random distribution throughout the Quinte limestone walls. This decorative use of two types of limestone can be seen in St. Mark’s Hall, completed 1888.

Architectural details

Square tower with adjoining tower-like bay
Stone gables
Wooden dormer windows
Ashlar masonry surrounds of the heavy arched openings and clock faces
Metal and slate roofs
Variety of window shapes and sizes
Stone corbels supporting the overhanging sloped roofs
Rugged, heavy stonework